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The Escalation Cycle Relating to Behaviours

Have you heard of the Escalation Cycle relating to behaviours? Well, it's a visual that reflects stages of behaviours and places these behaviours into categories.

It just gives you an idea of what stage your child is at!


Ask yourself 'What is the child's normal day-to-day behaviour? For instance, starting with baseline behaviours for example talks, socially interacting, expressive, thought-provoking, engaging in activities etc.


The stage of triggering event-How can you identify that the child is becoming triggered?

For example - the expression on his or her face becomes introverted when normally extroverted, may stop listening, may say "I'm bored", the face becomes serious- scowl, the tension on the face, etc there may be many body language signs.


The stage of Escalation Behaviours reflects what the child's behaviour looks like when escalating. It may reflect actions to get a reaction from others or do something for attention-seeking purposes, attempting to play in a disruptive way to peers, etc


The stage of outburst is the most peak heightened behavior of a child. It could look like swearing, running away-trying to get distance-action of showing I want my space, yelling, or physical aggression.


The recovery stage "What are the signs that the child is beginning to de-escalate and recover?


The answer is the child won't engage in conversation or may have repetitive behaviour to make themselves feel safe.


Are There strategies to implement avoiding triggers and escalated behaviour from occurring?


Some strategies for providing provision are giving responsibilities, giving a leadership job to do, visuals and consistent routines, sensory play, imaginative play, nature club, including interests and like into programming, space to relax/rest, executive functioning visuals (breaking down steps), outdoor play, etc.


Intervention strategies to use to intervene when a child is identified as triggered or becoming escalated?


A few solutions are to give the child a choice of what to do around interests, refer back to visuals, ask if they want space, give encouragement to find a safe space or quiet space, support engagement into an activity, or offer experiences he or she enjoys, etc.


The Recovery stage includes strategies that will be used to support a child once they have recovered.


Provide space, placing resources that the child is interested in within sight/view-allowing for access if liked, and place sensory or fidget resources near the child which allows access.


Using common language with all parties involved in the individual support plan such as "It's ok", "I understand", " I hear", "I see", "You can have your own space" and "I will be here if you need me".


Conclusion - Aiming to have an individual support plan is a necessity for success in creating a more productive and happier environment.


Have you heard of the Escalation Cycle relating to behaviours? Well, it's a visual that reflects stages of behaviours and places these behaviours into categories.

It just gives you an idea of what stage your child is at!





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